2016 Racing

Iceboating Report from PEI

Six DNs travelled from Nova Scotia to PEI this weekend to join PEI-based NIYC members on Covehead Bay, near Stanhope. Some were cruisers but there were enough racers for us to decide to sail for the Nova Ice Yacht Club’s Nova Scotia trophy – OK , we were in PEI, but have you seen any ice in NS recently? There was about 2 km of available ice with plenty of room to set a course about 0.6 mile in length.

Temperatures were below freezing all weekend. On Saturday we sailed on 7 or 8 inches of hard salt-water ice covered with about 3 inches of soft snow. The wind started at about 8 knots and built to 10 to 12 as the day progressed. Plate runners and FO1s were the order of the day. As the day wore on the snow began to drift and the ride got bumpier as the boats knocked to tops off the drifts. It was fast, powered-up sailing, and Bob Crinion had the measure of us with six bullets.

Saturday night we retired to Doug Gaudet’s for dinner where Helen treated us well; indeed, at lunch on Saturday she brought hot chili to the launch site!

Sunday morning dawned clear and windy, and as feared Saturday’s drifts had hardened into boat-breakers. There were lots of clear patches, but the prospect of tearing a plank off on a hardened drift or having an out-of-boat experience brought common sense to the fore. We loaded up and headed home. Despite sailing only one day we had a grand time, with special thanks to hosts Doug an Helen Gaudet. Photos by Doug and Helen too.

If that is the end of the season, it ended well! Great Western Challenge next?

Races Total
1 Bob Crinion 1 1 1 1 1 1 5
2 Warren Nethercote 3 2 3 2 RET 2 12
3 Danny Mosher 4 4 4 4 2 3 17
4 Art Samson 2 3 2 3 DNS DNS 18
5 Wayne Matheson 5 5 5 7 3 5 23
6 Mike Webber DNS DNS 6 5 4 4 27
7 Howard Garland 6 6 7 6 5 DNS 30

Warren

2016 Nova Scotia Championships
March 19, 2016. Covehead Bay, PEI


2016 DN NA’s – And The Winner Is…

The results are in. More recaps out tomorrow some time. It’s a long haul home to RI.

In the mean time take a look at how the NEIYA was represented on the results.

More later,

T

2016 DN North American Championship Results

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2016 DN NA Thursday Report

Hello All,

Big day at the NAs. Breeze still up, wild full speed sailing all day.

Personally I one-upped myself.   My spin yesterday paled in comparison to today’s leeward mark spin and out-of-boat experience.   No harm done, got back in and finished the race.

Other than that a good day-  the eastern gang is doing well-   LI, NJ, RI, NY, CT, all having a blast and enjoying some moments of brilliance!  Check attached results to see how your gang is doing!

Last day of racing tomorrow,  will see what the day brings!

Put this one on your calendar for next year folks…

Think Ice!  T

2016 IDNIYRA NORTH AMERICAN CHAMPIONSHIPS 
FEBRUARY 22 - 27, 2016
LAKE MONONA
MADISON, WISCONSON
Gold fleet
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pos    Sail#            Name           Race>     1    2    3    4    5  Points
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  1   US  183       STRUBLE,            MATT     1    1    1    1 (  2)   4.00
  2   US   44        SHERRY,         RON (S)     2 (  2)   2    2    1    7.00
  3   US 5224       THIELER,           JAMES     3    4 ( 14)   3    3   13.00
  4    G  936          KOLB,        JOST (S)     4    7 ( 11)   4    4   19.00
  5   US 1188        HADLEY,       JAMES (S)     6    5    4 (  8)   5   20.00
  6   US   60        HARPER,        JOHN (M)  ( 11)   9    3    5    8   25.00
  7   US    3        GROGAN,         JIM (M)  ( 23)   8    7    9   10   34.00
  8    G  679     SCHNEIDER,    MARTIN-BJORN    10 ( 16)   5   14    7   36.00
  9   US 5469         MOORE,          OLIVER  ( 18)  11    6   10   14   41.00
 10   US 4975         EVANS,      ROBERT (S)    13   15    9 ( 20)   6   43.00
 11    H  467 VAN RIEMSDIJK,     DIDERIC (S)     7 ( 18)  17    7   16   47.00
 12   US 5053          REIS,      GEORGE (M)    19 ( 33)  12    6   12   49.00
 13   US 5214      MCDONAGH,             JIM    14   10   13   12 ( 19)  49.00
 14    S  713      GUSTRING,     RICKARD (M)     9   17   15 ( 18)  13   54.00
 15   US 4487        ATKINS,            CHAD  (DNF)  25    8   16    9   58.00
 16   US  807       FRANCIS,              JR    12   21   10   19 ( 27)  62.00
 17   US 5166        BERGER,           CHRIS    15   14   19   15 ( 22)  63.00
 18   US  216       POTCOVA,     RICHARD (S)    16   19 ( 22)  11   20   66.00
 19    G  666         SIEMS,     TORSTEN (S)  ( 45)  22   18   22   15   77.00
 20   US 3705        HOLMAN,      ROBERT (S)  ( 42)  12   21   21   24   78.00
 21   US 5432         BLOOM,        MIKE (S)  (DNF)  13   23   17   28   81.00
 22    G  551       SEEGERS,   CHRISTIAN (M)    21   23   16   23 ( 26)  83.00
 23   US 5116         CLAPP,        DAVE (S)    20 ( 30)  27   26   11   84.00
 24   US 5352         HEARN,      DANIEL (S)    24   20   20   24 (DNS)  88.00
 25   US 3283      WILLIAMS,    J.BRUCE (GM)    22   29   24 ( 30)  18   93.00
 26   US 5298         BROWN,       SCOTT (S)    17   28   32   25 ( 35) 102.00
 27   US 5501      ORLEBEKE,           PETER    30 ( 34)  29   13   31  103.00
 28   US  637      MEADE IV,             JOE    26   24   26   29 ( 34) 105.00
 29   US 5285          TEAL,       CHRIS (S)    29   27 ( 36)  28   25  109.00
 30   US 2545       DERUSHA,        MIKE (S)     8    3 (DNS) DNS  DNS  113.00
 31   US 4926      ORLEBEKE,           STEVE     5    6 (DNS) DNS  DNS  113.00
 32   US 5219         BAKER,            KENT    25   26   33   31 ( 36) 115.00
 33   US 4148         DIXON,         TIM (S)  ( 38)  35   31   34   17  117.00
 34   US 5358         FROST,       DAVID (S)  ( 43)  31   25   33   29  118.00
 35   US 5415        MILLER,           CHRIS    28 ( 43)  28   32   30  118.00
 36   US 4882        WOLLAM,     RICHARD (M)    37   32 ( 37)  27   32  128.00
 37   US 4868      RICHARDS,       JULIE (M)    34 (DNS)  35   38   23  130.00
 38   US 4974         JONES,       STAN (GM)    27   37   34 ( 39)  37  135.00
 39   KC 5514        CURTIS,            JOHN    33 ( 44)  43   40   21  137.00
 40   US 1277        BOWMAN,        HAL (GM)    35   38   30   37 ( 39) 140.00
 41   US  610         JONES,     DONALD (GM)    31   40   40   35 ( 42) 146.00
 42   US 3433       CUMMINS,      ROBERT (M)    36   36 ( 42)  42   33  147.00
 43   US 5430       CUTTING,        BILL (S)    39   39   38   36 ( 40) 152.00
 44   US 2360         JOHNS,       PETE (GM)    40 ( 42)  41   41   38  160.00
 45   US 4335         GLICK,        DAVE (M)    41   41   39 ( 43)  41  162.00
 46   US 5369        MILLER,        MIKE (M)    32  DNS (DNS) DNS  DNS  185.00
 47   US 5350     TRUESDELL,       PETER (S)    44   45 (DNS) DNS  DNS  191.00
 48   KC 2766    VAN ROSSEM,       PETER (S)    46  DNS (DNS) DNS  DNS  199.00
 49T  US  472       COBERLY, J. WILLIAM (GM)   DNS (DNS) DNS  DNS  DNS  204.00
 50T  US  445          CAVE,         BOB (M)   DNS (DNS) DNS  DNS  DNS  204.00

Scoring system: IDNIYRA Worlds




Silver fleet
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Pos    Sail#         Name       Race>     1    2    3    4    5  Points
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
  1   US 5507    BARNETT,        MIKE     5 (DNS)   1    1    1    8.00
  2   US 3937     VOUGHT,  DANIEL (S)  (  4)   1    3    3    2    9.00
  3   US 5486      ELSMO,       DAVID     3    2    2 (  5)   3   10.00
  4   US 4155    LEMBERG, RICHARD (M)     1    4    4    4 (  5)  13.00
  5   US 4203 FITZGERALD, PATRICK (M)     6    3    6 (  7)   6   21.00
  6   US 5435    KJOLLER,        JODY    15    6    5    2 (DNS)  28.00
  7   KC 3786 NETHERCOTE,  WARREN (M)     7 ( 10)   7    6    8   28.00
  8   US 5498     GORDON,    RICK (S)  ( 13)   5   11   11    4   31.00
  9   US 5156   SOBERING,   GEOFF (S)     8 ( 18)  10   10    9   37.00
 10   US  294   LOENNEKE,  LOUIS (GM)    12 (DNS)   8    8   11   39.00
 11   US 5633   JOHANSON,       PETER    10    8 ( 13)   9   12   39.00
 12   US 5478   GORITSKI,    JACK (M)     2   15 ( 15)  13   10   40.00
 13   US 1313       RAST,  ROBERT (M)     9    9    9 ( 14)  13   40.00
 14   US 5158     BUSHEY,    JOHN (M)    11   13   12 ( 16)   7   43.00
 15   US 4490      MADGE,    MIKE (S)  ( 18)   7   16   12   16   51.00
 16   US 5451      ALLEN,    ANDY (S)  ( 25)  11   17   15   14   57.00
 17   US   65       GRAY, ROBERT (GM)    17   12   14 ( 18)  15   58.00
 18   US 4137   SMITH JR,     KEN (M)    16   14 ( 18)  17   17   64.00
 19   US 4925  VALENTINE,   SCOTT (S)    19   16   19 ( 20)  19   73.00
 20   US 5397      LENON,    JORI (S)    20   17 ( 20)  19   18   74.00
 21   KC 5457     DUNCAN,   COLIN (M)    22   19   21   22 (DNS)  84.00
 22   US  107     KAISER,    HANK (M)    23 (DNS)  22   23   21   89.00
 23   US 5296    COLEMAN,     PAT (M)   DNS (DNS)  23   21   20   95.00
 24   US 1610      BROWN,   BRUCE (M)    14  DNS (DNS) DNS  DNS  107.00
 25   US 4140     HOEPER,   PETER (M)    21  DNS (DNS) DNS  DNS  114.00
 26   US 3271  JANKOWSKI,    MIKE (M)    24  DNS (DNS) DNS  DNS  117.00
 27   US51161      CLAPP,     MIKE JR    26  DNS (DNS) DNS  DNS  119.00
 28T  US 4271  JANKOWSKI,   JULIE (S)   DNS (DNS) DNS  DNS  DNS  124.00
 29T  US 5517   THOMPSON,       JASON   DNS (DNS) DNS  DNS  DNS  124.00
 30T   P   71 ZIOLKOWSKI,  LESZEK (M)   DNS (DNS) DNS  DNS  DNS  124.00

Scoring system: IDNIYRA Worlds

Big Day At NAs

Big breeze saw the gold qualifier done and gold fleet race one done- That’s the good news- Bad news is a few masts gave up and a few boats need a little patching up!

Personally I had an interesting race…. Off the line from spot #18, good acceleration and clear air. Boat felt good and was going well. Tacked over to port as soon as I could.

Big lifting puffs from the left were a gift from above- I left the darling mark to port and tacked over, rounded the top mark with a decent lead.

Took off like a shot down the run and of course over stood the layline by a mile and was passed by Matt Struble, Ron Sherry, and Jost Kolb. Oops….

Passed Jost at the mark rounding, sneaked past Ron on the beat and got back into second. The CSI sled was wicked up and tuned in! Breeze was way up, easing sheet upwind was necessary to keep the mast off the ice…. Radical.

Next leg over stood again but by less- held onto second.

Next beat was able to stay to windward of Ron to the port layline then tacked for the mark. One leg to go, reminded myself aloud not to do anything stupid….

Downwind breeze was up, over stood by a bit again, boat was bouncing all over and really twitchy- here’s where it gets interesting…..

About 100 yards from the finish- Neck and neck w Ron Sherry, second place on the line. I said aloud to myself “don’t do anything dumb, second is as good as first”. I should have dropped the sheet and coasted over the line but NOOOOO, I just had to push it and haul the sheet a little- heading up to cross the line and suddenly the world was spinning- Rapidly.

Long story short I did at least a 360, maybe a 720. It happened fast. When the rotation stopped I could see orange out of my left eye- I figured that was the mark so all good there. Out of my right eye I could see a checkered flag being held by a rapidly back-pedaling John Atkins. So I was pointed the right way and had actually crossed the line (possibly stern first) to take third.

I did notice in the middle of all this that the entire silver fleet was watching along with every boat behind me, so I get points or maximum public self-humiliation. I didn’t even think about trying to play it cool about this one! The chop-busting started immediately- jokes about showing off, grandstanding for the cameras, needing a tutu for the boat since it pirouettes like a ballet dancer etc… What the hell, I still got a third!

Stay tuned for more- the second part of the day was pretty cool too…. Trust me.

T

James “T” Thieler12 Channing St.
Newport, RI. 02840

401 258 6230
t_thieler


“Deja Vu All Over Again”

No breeze again today at the DN NAs….. But at least we made it out to the race course for awhile….

The local club put on a mid-lake BBQ for everyone- many thanks to the crew that made that happen- helped ease the pain quite a bit!

No racing but more BBQ waiting when we got in- Along with a keg. In the photo see Chris Miller of LI recovering from the psychological strain of standing around on the ice all day- Obviously he is teetering on the brink of a total mental meltdown.

Should be some breeze tomorrow- Fingers crossed!

Think Ice…. T

James “T” Thieler12 Channing St.
Newport, RI. 02840

401 258 6230
t_thieler


NA Day One

Hey Folks-

The qualifier race is in the books here at the NAs-

Matt Struble barely made the time limit in the light air to take the top spot- lots of other boats struggled and the scorers have their work cut out for them tonight….

We hope to have a little more breeze tomorrow- stay tuned!

As for the photos, that would be our own Oliver Moore fixing a broken hiking rack in the hotel room. Wish I’d taken photos of us dragging it up the stairwell to the fourth floor-

In any case it just wouldn’t be a DN regatta without a little hotel room repair job!

Stay tuned- Hope everyone gets some sailing out that way-
T

 

James “T” Thieler12 Channing St.
Newport, RI. 02840

401 258 6230
t_thieler


NA Champs Started

Hey Folks- flags raised, registration under way, race one tomorrow if we have breeze….

Decent turnout- Plenty of eastern representation!

Check the photos:
-According to my car thermometer it was 70F as I drove across Ohio….
-Rick Lemberg being interviewed for French TV
-Deb Whitehorse gets a special award (a dozen roses) for being generally awesome
-flag raising ceremony.

 

 

James “T” Thieler12 Channing St.
Newport, RI. 02840

401 258 6230
t_thieler


UPDATE: 2016 DN Eastern Region Championship Postponed

The 2016 DN Eastern Region Championship will once again be postponed due to the extreme forecast for this weekend in Colchester, VT on Inner Mallets Bay.

Next up for the IDNIYRA is the North Americans starting next week February 22nd with registration the night before.  Information: NOR full registration info at IDNIYRA.org

See you there,

Chad Atkins  – ERC
catkins4487@gmail.com


Update: 2016 DN Eastern Region Championships

The 2016 Eastern Region Championships could very well be held this weekend Feb. 13-14. This is a preliminary heads up to be ready to roll, With a final call to be made by Thursday Feb. 11 at 5pm, Most likely venue will be Inner Mallets Bay, Colchester, VT where the plate has been sailed by ranked sailors and reported to have about a 3/4 Mile course size available.

There was 1/2″ of light snow dropped last night and could see some more tonight and into tomorrow- The real issue we face at this point is going to be temperature. Please take this time to be very well prepared for arctic, single digit temps if you plan on attending (No skin showing!)  I am also seeking a few hearty souls to help with scoring and RC for this event, Please email me if you can help or are interested in helping or have any questions regarding this event. There is also the possibility of some scratch racing on Friday depending on a launch site and weather.
**Here are two Amendments to the original NOR posted below**

A1- Sail # does not need to match fuselage # or skippers registered IDNIYRA # but does need to be unique to each skippers sail (no duplicates on course)
-Skipper still needs to be a current member of IDNIYRA in good standing

A2- Only this forum and theneiya.org website will be used for notice and updates of this event

Best,

Chad Atkins  – ERC
catkins4487@gmail.com
401 787 4567

P.S. Editors note, RC and scorers get the best seat in the house as well as being on hand to rec sail what looks to be a great plate of ice.


2016 DN Eastern Regionals Are Postponed

Due to lack of sailable ice the 2016 Eastern’s slated for this coming weekend will be postponed until further notice.

Stay tuned as ice is setting up all over New England.

Eastern regional updates can be found at http://dnamerica.org/forum/index.php?topic=1891.0

Best, Chad


NA Champs Registration OPEN!

Interested in doing the North American DN Champs? Registration is now open- sign up on line, nothing to it-

Normally this is a three-fleet regatta, so whatever your skill level or tech-level of your boat sign up and come join the fun! There is a fleet for you- Attending an event like this is a great way to check out the scene, meet some people, scope out and/or get cool gear, learn a ton, and check out the accents that the folks west of here have….

Info and registration here:
https://ice.idniyra.org/

Think ICE!!

James “T” Thieler


National Iceboat Authority (NIA) Darling Mark Animated Course Guide

NEIYA site viewers may have already read this elsewhere originally posted on the Four Lakes Ice Yacht Club site http://iceboat.org or elsewhere. The animations are a great help in understanding the use of the Darling mark. The original article with larger pictures can be found here http://iceboat.org/animation.html

National Iceboat Authority Racing Rules Change Summary

By Tim McCormick
This is an excerpt. Read the entire summary here.

DARLING COURSE
The second course is the DARLING COURSE, which is a STANDARD COURSE modified with
the addition of two DARLING MARKS which must be left to PORT. This is named in honor of
John Darling who was the resident race committee and race starter in the New Jersey area
throughout the 1970’s and 1980’s. Mr. Darling was the first to use the DARLING MARK at the
leeward end of the course. The DARLING MARK serves several purposes:.

WINDWARD APPROACH

A. In larger fleets, there can be a tendency for some of the even side starters on
STARBOARD TACK to over stand the windward MARK. When they tack over to PORT
TACK, they are set up for a head on collision with yachts that have already rounded the
windward MARK. Therefore, near the windward MARK, the DARLING MARK creates
separation between ON-THE-WIND PORT TACK yachts and OFF-THE-WIND
STARBOARD TACK yachts to minimize collisions.

WINDWARD AFTER ROUNDING

B. After rounding the windward MARK, some yachts may desire to JIBE as soon as
possible. This can create head-on collision situations with STARBOARD TACK ONTHE-WIND
yachts that have understood the windward MARK. Therefore, near the
windward MARK, the DARLING MARK creates separation between ON-THE-WIND
STARBOARD TACK yachts and OFF-THE-WIND PORT TACK yachts to minimize
collisions.

LEEWARD MARK

C. Creates separation between a PORT TACK ON-THE-WIND yacht that has just rounded
the leeward MARK and STARBOARD TACK OFF-THE-WIND yachts approaching the
leeward MARK.
D. Creates separation between a STARBOARD TACK ON-THE-WIND yacht that has just
rounded the leeward MARK and subsequently TACKED and a PORT TACK OFF-THEWIND
yacht approaching the leeward MARK.

The bottom line is….the DARLING MARK is intended to create separation between yachts
which should minimize head-on collisions near the potentially congested areas around a MARK.
Some may claim that DARLING MARKS reduce the playing field and reduce the tactical
freedom of a race. I think they’re overstating it. With a 1 mile course and two DARLING
MARKS each placed 100 yards from their associated MARK, the “tactical area” is only reduced
by 11% (200yards x 1 mile/1760 yards = 0.11). Typically sailors don’t change tacks until
they’ve completed the MARK rounding and achieved full speed. That is likely 50 yards from a
MARK so the real effect on the “tactical area” is more like 5%. This is a minor issue compared
to the safety gained.

A key point regarding DARLING MARKS is the imaginary line between the MARK and its
accompanying DARLING MARK is considered part of the MARK. Therefore, if a yacht crosses
over this line, she will have fouled the MARK and be disqualified.

The disadvantage of the DARLING MARKS, of course, is the need for the Race Committee to
have additional equipment and the added labor of placing or moving the DARLING MARKS on
the course.

Animations by Dave Elsmo DN US5486
For original article and lager images http://iceboat.org/animation.html

 

1. STARTING PROCEDURE

TACKING AT THE START OF A RACE
One of the safety issues addressed is protecting the Race Committee immediately following the
start of a race. New rule IV.C.3 states: “After a yacht starts and until she rounds the windward
MARK for the first time, a yacht shall not pass between the center of the starting line (positions
1 and 2) and the leeward MARK.” This prevents yachts from tacking immediately after the start
of the race and endangering the Race Committee.
Note that the leeward mark, darling mark and the line between them are all considered part of the
mark- thus, a yacht must keep them both on the proper side on the first pass after starting (starboard
tack starters must keep them both on the starboard side and port tack starters must keep them both to port.)

2. WINDWARD MARK- APPROACH

In larger fleets, there can be a tendency for some of the even side starters on
STARBOARD TACK to over stand the windward MARK. When they tack over to PORT
TACK, they are set up for a head on collision with yachts that have already rounded the
windward MARK. Therefore, near the windward MARK, the DARLING MARK creates
separation between ON-THE-WIND PORT TACK yachts and OFF-THE-WIND
STARBOARD TACK yachts to minimize collisions.

3. WINDWARD MARK – AFTER ROUNDING

After rounding the windward MARK, some yachts may desire to JIBE as soon as
possible. This can create head-on collision situations with STARBOARD TACK ONTHE-WIND
yachts that have understood the windward MARK. Therefore, near the
windward MARK, the DARLING MARK creates separation between ON-THE-WIND
STARBOARD TACK yachts and OFF-THE-WIND PORT TACK yachts to minimize
collisions.

4. LEEWARD MARK – APPROACH

Creates separation between a PORT TACK ON-THE-WIND yacht that has just rounded
the leeward MARK and STARBOARD TACK OFF-THE-WIND yachts approaching the
leeward MARK.

5. LEEWARD MARK – AFTER ROUNDING

Creates separation between a STARBOARD TACK ON-THE-WIND yacht that has just
rounded the leeward MARK and subsequently TACKED and a PORT TACK OFF-THEWIND
yacht approaching the leeward MARK

6. FINISH – CORRECT PROCEDURE

7. FINISH – INCORRECT PROCEDURE

8. WINDWARD MARK RIGHT OF WAY

Another addition is Right-of-Way rule 8.a which states: “When yachts sailing ON-THE-WIND on
opposite tacks are approaching a MARK, the PORT TACK yacht shall keep clear of the
STARBOARD TACK yacht.” This new rule eliminates the previous confusion about the
governing rule when approaching the windward MARK: Did the STARBOARD TACK yacht
have rights over the PORT TACK yacht or was the PORT TACK yacht inside and therefore
require the STARBOARD TACK yacht to stay clear? This new rule clarifies that the PORT
TACK yacht shall keep clear.

9. WINDWARD MARK RIGHT OF WAY

Another addition is Right-of-Way rule 8.a which states: “When yachts sailing ON-THE-WIND on
opposite tacks are approaching a MARK, the PORT TACK yacht shall keep clear of the
STARBOARD TACK yacht.” This new rule eliminates the previous confusion about the
governing rule when approaching the windward MARK: Did the STARBOARD TACK yacht
have rights over the PORT TACK yacht or was the PORT TACK yacht inside and therefore
require the STARBOARD TACK yacht to stay clear? This new rule clarifies that the PORT
TACK yacht shall keep clear.


2015 National Iceboat Authority Racing Rules Change Summary

Our regional IDNIYRA representative Chad Atkins passed this on for all to read. This and other racing information will be available as a permanent link on the right of the neiya.org home page. Thanks Chad!

Rules instruction and discussion and boat preparation will be featured at our Annual Tune-up at Steve Lamb’s shop in Canton MA December 5th. More on the Tune-up to come…

Pdf and or read below 2015 NIA Racing Rules Change Summary.pdf

 

By: Tim McCormick November 13, 2015

INTRODUCTION

The National Iceboat Authority (NIA) Racing Rules have served ice boating well for several decades. They were developed so sailors from different regions could race safely by following a common set of rules. This recent update is meant to provide improvements that keep pace with some of the lessons learned during that time. Since July, 2015, the Directors of the NIA have been meeting regularly via telephone and email to discuss the proposed changes. Many hours of editing, deliberation, and debate have been invested. For example, I have participated in over 8 hours of teleconferences and sent or received over 400 emails on this topic since July.

The biggest change most sailors will notice is the addition of two race course configurations called DARLING COURSE and INLINE COURSE which may be used as alternatives to the STANDARD COURSE we’ve been using for many years. This allows Race Committees to select a course which is most appropriate for their ice sailing event. Many different course layouts were discussed, but we felt it important to limit the number of combinations in order to prevent confusion. This was always a key point: allow some flexibility for Race Committees while minimizing confusion for sailors. On the race course, the goal for sailors is to be able to react intuitively and with common sense. Therefore, the number of possible race course configurations needed to be limited. We concluded three configurations met this purpose.

STANDARD COURSE

The first course is the STANDARD COURSE. This is unchanged from the previous Racing Rules.

DARLING COURSE

The second course is the DARLING COURSE, which is a STANDARD COURSE modified with the addition of two DARLING MARKS which must be left to PORT. This is named in honor of John Darling who was the resident race committee and race starter in the New Jersey area throughout the 1970’s and 1980’s. Mr. Darling was the first to use the DARLING MARK at the leeward end of the course. The DARLING MARK serves several purposes:

  1. In larger fleets, there can be a tendency for some of the even side starterso n STARBOARD TACK to over stand the windward MARK. When they tack over to PORT TACK, they are set up for a head on collision with yachts that have already rounded the windward MARK. Therefore, near the windward MARK, the DARLING MARK creates separation between ON-THE-WIND PORT TACK yachts and OFF-THE-WIND STARBOARD TACK yachts to minimize collisions.
  2. After rounding the windward MARK, some yachts may desire to  JIBE as soon as possible. This can create head-on collision situations with STARBOARD TACK ON- THE-WIND yachts that have understood the windward MARK. Therefore, near the windward MARK, the DARLING MARK creates separation between ON-THE-WIND

STARBOARD TACK yachts and OFF-THE-WIND PORT TACK yachts to minimize

collisions.
C. Creates separation between a PORT TACK ON-THE-WIND yacht that has just rounded

the leeward MARK and STARBOARD TACK OFF-THE-WIND yachts approaching the

leeward MARK.
D. Creates separation between a STARBOARD TACK ON-THE-WIND yacht that has just

rounded the leeward MARK and subsequently TACKED and a PORT TACK OFF-THE- WIND yacht approaching the leeward MARK.

The bottom line is….the DARLING MARK is intended to create separation between yachts which should minimize head-on collisions near the potentially congested areas around a MARK. Some may claim that DARLING MARKS reduce the playing field and reduce the tactical freedom of a race. I think they’re overstating it. With a 1 mile course and two DARLING MARKS each placed 100 yards from their associated MARK, the “tactical area” is only reduced by 11% (200yards x 1 mile/1760 yards = 0.11). Typically sailors don’t change tacks until they’ve completed the MARK rounding and achieved full speed. That is likely 50 yards from a MARK so the real effect on the “tactical area” is more like 5%. This is a minor issue compared to the safety gained.

A key point regarding DARLING MARKS is the imaginary line between the MARK and its accompanying DARLING MARK is considered part of the MARK. Therefore, if a yacht crosses over this line, she will have fouled the MARK and be disqualified.

The disadvantage of the DARLING MARKS, of course, is the need for the Race Committee to have additional equipment and the added labor of placing or moving the DARLING MARKS on the course.

INLINE COURSE

The third course is the INLINE COURSE. This is A DARLING COURSE modified with the finish line being placed in line with the windward and leeward MARKS. This configuration has been used successfully for years in the Eastern region of the US. The INLINE COURSE is intended to provide the following advantages:

  1. Due to  the placement of the leeward DARLING MARK, all yachts  should be sailing in the same direction at the finish.
  2. The Race Committee location during the finish is more protected than when a perpendicular finish is used.
  3. On smaller sailing areas, such as those which can be found  in the Eastern US, there is not enough room to have a finish line perpendicular to the wind and direct the finished yachts through a safety zone, then round up from OFF-THE-WIND to ON_THE-WIND and coast into the parking area(s). The INLINE COURSE finish line uses less space because it directs finishing yachts parallel to the starting line and directs finished yachts around the odd end of the starting line.
  4. All finished yachts would been entering the parking area from the same direction.
  5. No safety zone for the Race Committee to setup.

F. Since there is no safety zone, all yachts sailing in the following race would be allowed to line up on the starting line. This makes it easier for those sailors and quicker for the Race Committee to start the next race.

A disadvantage of the INLINE COURSE is the MARK end of the finish line is significantly “favored”. This may cause congestion near the MARK end of the finish line, but the fact that all yachts are traveling in the same direction should make that issue more manageable. In addition, the lack of a safety zone means there is less room to evade a hazardous situation near the leeward MARK. Similar to the DARLING COURSE, the Race Committee will need additional equipment and added labor for placing or moving the DARLING MARKS.

RACE COURSE SELECTION

No one race course is perfect; however some course configurations may work better for your sailing event. We’re relying on the Race Committee of the event to make the best decision for your fleet. As you can see in the descriptions above, there are significant differences in the race courses and it will take time for sailors to become comfortable with a new course. With this in mind, the NIA recommends that once a course configuration is selected for the event, this should not be changed for the duration of that event.

SAFETY ZONE

The safety zone has created much debate amongst ice sailors over the years. Some have claimed it’s a “danger zone” rather than a safety zone since it is often littered with parked yachts, moving yachts, personal gear, or spectators. It’s true that a safety zone which is not correctly set up or enforced can be dangerous. We discussed eliminating it, but concluded that it adds more to safety than detracts from it. The bottom line is we must do better as Race Committees and sailors to enforce and self-police the safety zone to make sure it truly is making everyone safer.

APPROACHING THE WINDWARD MARK

Another addition is Right-of-Way rule 8.a which states: “When yachts sailing ON-THE-WIND on opposite tacks are approaching a MARK, the PORT TACK yacht shall keep clear of the STARBOARD TACK yacht.” This new rule eliminates the previous confusion about the governing rule when approaching the windward MARK: Did the STARBOARD TACK yacht have rights over the PORT TACK yacht or was the PORT TACK yacht inside and therefore require the STARBOARD TACK yacht to stay clear? This new rule clarifies that the PORT TACK yacht shall keep clear.

PROPULSION

You may have noticed that some of the better runners in our fleets might push their boat straight upwind or downwind during a light air race. In addition, they might push straight upwind during the start, then layoff, when tactically advantageous, to start wind propulsion. This practice is now limited by Sailing rule D which now states: “Propulsion – A yacht may not employ any means of propulsion other than the action of the wind on the sails. However, the crew (unassisted by anyone except for reasons of physical disability as authorized by the Judges) may push the yacht to achieve wind propulsion.” The previous version of the rule stated: “may push the yacht to leave the starting line or to return the yacht to wind propulsion when

necessary.” The previous wording allowed a sailor to push straight upwind from the starting line without the intent of achieving wind propulsion. The simple point of the new wording is that any pushing, other than pushing to achieve wind propulsion, is not allowed.

TACKING AT THE START OF A RACE

One of the safety issues addressed is protecting the Race Committee immediately following the start of a race. New rule IV.C.3 states: “After a yacht starts and until she rounds the windward MARK for the first time, a yacht shall not pass between the center of the starting line (positions 1 and 2) and the leeward MARK.” This prevents yachts from tacking immediately after the start of the race and endangering the Race Committee.

ROOM TO FINISH

Another point which has often confused sailors is Right-of-Way rule 8.b, which states: “Each yacht shall be entitled to room to cross the finish line.” This is often misinterpreted and I’ve even heard some champion sailors state after a particularly close race: “I left you plenty of room to finish: …..behind me”. This is not the intent of the rule. The intent is explained in the Rules Interpretations on page 22: Right-of-way rule #8 giving each yacht room to finish is for the ends of the line and is designed to keep the race committee from getting killed and to avoid general havoc in the finishing area. Port tack yachts shall keep clear of STARBOARD TACK yachts except at the committee end of the line where PORT TACK must be given room to finish. At the ends of the line a windward yacht must allow a leeward yacht room to finish. The bottom line here is sailors must use COMMON SENSE as explained in Sailing Rule A.

CONCLUSION

The changes to the NIA Racing Rules are significant and may take some time to get used to. Many sailors will continue to use the STANDARD COURSE and these changes will have little effect on them. The important point to remember is: using the DARLING COURSE or INLINE COURSE is optional, so you can choose the course which fits your fleet best. Regardless of which course you choose, the 2015 Racing Rules should make your sailing safe, fair, and fun, in that order.


NOR 2016 Eastern Region DN Championship

NOTICE OF RACE

Eastern Lakes Regional DN Championship Regatta
Jan 9-10, 2016
North American Eastern Region

Organizing Authority
International DN Ice Yacht Racing Association
North American Eastern Region

1. Rules:
All races will be governed by the Racing Rules of the National Iceboat Authority; the By-Laws of the IDNIYRA, and Official Specifications of the DN Ice Yacht; the Notice of Race, including any amendments to the Notice of Race, (except as any of these are altered by the sailing instructions) and the Sailing Instructions. The Sailing Instructions can be modified at the Skippers Meeting and by a notice posted on the official notice board.

Nine race regatta format – 3 race minimum in the Gold Fleet will constitute the regatta. Fleets – Gold & Silver Fleet, Plate Runner Division, Rookie Division, Volunteer split for fleets if needed. Discard race after 6 races sailed.

2. Eligibility:
All DN class yachts meeting the requirements of the Official Specifications and whose skippers meet the requirements of the By-Laws of the IDNIYRA as stated in the section IDNIYRA Regattas are eligible to enter and race in the championship.

3. Site Information and Postings:

  1. The primary site is within the North American Eastern Region
  2. Site and Headquarters Information will be determined by the regatta organizer.
  3. Official regatta information, updates and accommodations:  dnamerica.org, neiya.org & NEIYA hotline – (508) 377-6100 Box #8

4. Entry and Fee:
Register in the pits Saturday morning
$30 registration fee

5. Schedule of Events:

  • Sat 9:15-10am on ice registration
  • Sat 10am Skippers Meeting
  • Sat 11am First DN start
  • Sunday 10:00am First start. No race will start after 3PM

6. Sailing instructions
Official Sailing Instructions will be provided at registration.

7. Prizes
We are trying to locate any and all trophies for this event.

8. Proof of Insurance
Proof of personal or race liability insurance ($300,000 minimum)

Chad Atkins
IDNIYRA – Eastern Rear Commodore
catkins4487@gmail.com
(401) 787-456